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When the English Beat out the French in Nova Scotia

  Port Royal on the Annapolis Basin in Nova Scotia was the very first French settlement in North America.  It served as the capitol of Acadia (the North-Eastern-most colony of New France) from 1605 until the English burned it down in 1613.  The French then moved their settlement nearby (8km or 5mi), retaining the name of Port Royal until the English conquest in 1710 at the Siege of Port Royal (after six attacks by the British), at which point it was renamed in honour of Queen Anne, and still retains the name of Annapolis Royal.  The town was the Capitol of...

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The British Museum: How it came to be in 1753.

Such a perfect way to spend the day! Visiting the British Museum in London! 🇬🇧 Did you know that the British Museum came to be on June 7th 1753 when an Act of Parliament established the British Museum after Sir Hans Sloane bequeathed over 71,000 books, manuscripts, artifacts and pieces of art that he had collected over his lifetime, to King George II for his people, in exchange for 20,000 for Sir Hans Sloane's heirs? It wasn't until January 15th, 1759 that the museum first opened it's doors to the public in the same building in which much of the...

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The Royal Chapel of Dreux: The Traditional Burial Grounds for the House of Orleans, in France.

'The King's Chapel at Dreux. - Chapelle du roi, à Dreux. - Die Königs - Kapelle, zu Dreux.' in France, remains the customary burial ground for the House of Orleans in France, and boasts a rich history. This chapel lays here because in 1775 King Louis XVI of France gifted his cousin, Louis Jean Marie de Bourbon, Duke of Penthièvre, the county of Dreux in France. Eight years later, the Duke sold the King his castle in Rambouillet, after which the Duke had his family's remains brought to a crypt in the small chapel of Collégiale Saint-Étienne de Dreux on...

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Charles I Beheading: The Trial Begins...

Did you know that on this day in 1649, at the end of the Second English Civil War, Charles I was first put on trial for treason, which ended with his beheading on January 30th of the same year? Yikes!  From his marriage to a Catholic French Princess, Henrietta Marie, then his on and off disillusionment of parliament when his protestant countrymen were unsettled with his ways and rules of governing; at one point ruling entirely without parliament in 1629, Charles I was disliked by many.  The lengthy battle for supremacy between Parliamentarians and the Royalists ultimately led to the...

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Sir Paul Pindar’s House, Bishopsgate Street, Built in 1599-1600

‘Sir Paul Pindar’s House, Bishopsgate Street’ holds and important place in history. It’s wooden facade, built in 1599-1600, is one of the great wooden structural remnants that survived London’s Great Fire of 1666; and as such, it is preserved in the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Sir Paul Pindar was knighted in 1620 by King James I after his many accomplishments in trade, commerce and building. He even put forth £10,000 (a substantial amount at the time) towards rebuilding St. Paul’s Cathedral; along with loaning money to Charles I, who was never able to repay him. The ‘mansion’ was...

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